A Tale of Two Marys

If there is one thing genealogy has taught me is that you don’t have to look very far to find your hero or role model. I confess I did have a touch of writers block to the endless list of women who could be referenced here as having an impact on the society we live in
Read more

If there is one thing genealogy has taught me is that you don’t have to look very far to find your hero or role model. I confess I did have a touch of writers block to the endless list of women who could be referenced here as having an impact on the society we live in today. To name but a few of these notable women includes:

·  Edith Cavill (1865-1915) a British nurse executed for smuggling allied soldiers out of Belgium

·  Flora Sandes (1876-1956) the only British woman to serve as a soldier during WWI by enlisting in the Serbian Army

·  Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) the founder of modern nursing

·  Marie Curie (1867-1934) physicist and chemist

·  Rosa Parks (1913-2005), civil rights activist

·   Kathrine Switzer (1945-) the first woman to run the Boston marathon

·  Edith Smith (1876-1924), the first British female police officer

In a previous blog post entitled ‘Women and Genealogy’ I highlighted some notable women both on my tree and those that have been a big influence on me today. I want to give a mention to two more of the women on my tree:

Mary King (1867-1940)

She was b. 19thOctober 1867 in County Antrim to Robert King, engineer, and Mary Ann Duffin. Her marriage to John McNamee, labourer, took place on 15th May 1889 in St Anne’s Church, Belfast. They had 8 eight children during their 21 year marriage but only four of them lived to be adults:

1. William Charles McNamee b. 1st September1890 – d. 13th March 1907 of epilepsy aged 16

2.  Elizabeth McNamee b. 7th November 1892, m. David Sweeney 13th October 1917 and d. 9th January 1980

3. John McNamee b. 20th December 1894, m. Catherine Wilson 15th May 1915

4. Ellen McNamee b. 3rd September 1896 – d. 7thFebruary 1897

5. Mary McNamee b. 3rd September 1896 – d. 26thNovember 1899 of bronchitis, she was stated as having convulsions three hours before she died

6. Ellen McNamee b. 8th September 1898, m. David Wilson 4th May 1918 and d. 29th June 1961

7.  Mary McNamee b. 2nd February 1902

8.  Sarah McNamee b. 28th June 1904 – d. 14thSeptember 1904

 

Mary would also lose her husband John McNamee on 19th September 1910 as a result of heart problems at the age of 45. John was buried in Belfast City Cemetery but the records show there is no grave marker or plot number. Mary remained a widow until her death on 28th January 1940 at the age of 72. She is also buried in Belfast City Cemetery alongside the mother-in-law of her daughter Elizabeth.

Mary Nesbitt Foreman (1870- )

Daughter of Isabella Nesbitt and William Foreman, she married William Magill 12th December 1891 and had 11 children, only four of would survive:

1.  Elizabeth Caroline Magill b. 5th March 1896– d. 30th November 1896 of bronchitis, she is buried in a paupers grave in Belfast City Cemetery

2. William John Magill b. 13th April 1897

3. Samuel Henry Magill b. 5th September 1899, died as infant

4. Mary Magill b. 29th April 1901 – d. 24th August 1902 as a result of whooping cough and pneumonia, she is buried in a paupers grave in Belfast City Cemetery

5. Stephen Magill b. 9th May 1902 – d. 21st August 1902 as a result of whooping cough and convulsions, he is buried in a paupers grave in Belfast City Cemetery

6. Isabella Magill b. 9th May 1902 – d. 29th July 1902 as a result of whooping cough, like her siblings she is also buried in a paupers grave in Belfast City Cemetery

7.  James Edward Magill b. 1st September 1903

8. Wilhelmina Magill b. 15th October 1904 – d.13th July 1906 of pneumonia

9. Wilhelmina Magill b. 29th May 1907 – d. 15thDecember 1907

10. Robert Henry Magill b. 26th November 1909

11. Eleanor Jane Magill b. 9th April 1911

The first woman is my 3xGreat-Grandmother and the second is my first cousin 4 removed. They are ordinary women with ordinary lives who went through some hard times. They didn’t have anything like counselling, they didn’t have the things that we take for granted today. Yes they are ordinary women with ordinary lives but I feel their story is worth telling!

The link for my previous blog post ‘Women and Genealogy’ can be found below*:

www.oraclegenealogy.com/blog/women-and-genealogy

 

 

 

 

*Yes the story about my great-grandmother making herself homeless and penniless on purpose is true!

Back to blog listing

Begin the journey into your past today

Book your FREE initial consultation

Contact us today for your FREE initial consultation and find out how we can help you discover your past.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.